Support for btmon in Mynewt

Btmon is very useful tool for HCI messaging monitoring on Linux systems. It helps to understand how Bluetooth host talks to controller, debug issues, implement new features in the host etc. When we have started work with Mynewt we knew that we need tool like this. Of course Mynewt has a way to print all the HCI logs in hex, but decoding it on fly is not the best thing to do. So here it is, Mynewt can be configured in the way that btmon can be used. Detailed information you can find here. Below we show an example how to use it.

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Interoperability testing is important!

As we all know, each Bluetooth product shall work according to Bluetooth specification. It is fairly big specification, and that’s why before releasing your Bluetooth product it is very important that it can talk to other Bluetooth devices. Basically, we should check if we understand specification in the same way as others. That is why UnPlugFest (UPF) is organized 3 times per year by Bluetooth SIG, so developers can test their solutions with other products to verify they work together. Codecoup understands that and encourages its customers to be there. Speaking of which, we just came back from UPF56 in Atlanta where we had two teams testing two different IoT platforms.

Hacking Mynewt in Eclipse

Do you want to hack Apache Mynewt but do not know which IDE to use? Here is a short tutorial on how to configure Eclipse for working with Mynewt.

Using this setup you will have nicely working code indexer, integrated debugger and some other tools. Actually you will probably not need to use console anymore except for project configuration 🙂

Before you start, make sure you have Mynewt environment set properly and Eclipse CDT installed. This tutorial was created with Eclipse Neon (4.6.2), but previous versions should work as well – we also use it with Eclipse Mars without problems.

And final important note: it was tested on develop branch only.

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Bluetooth device qualification

Whenever you create a Bluetooth product you have to go through a process of qualification in order to get Bluetooth SIG stamp 🙂 This process is usually painful for developers and testers, especially when you are doing it for the first time. Fortunately, some of the Open Source stacks provide instructions on how to do this, which makes things bit easier. In this post, we will show you how to start a Bluetooth device qualification testing using an nRF52 board running Mynewt OS.

Mynewt is a Real-time operating system build with IoT in mind and provides open source networking stack including Bluetooth Low Energy. More details can be found on their website.

Mynewt allows to develop and run apps that perform specific tasks. bletiny is one of such applications. It allows controlling the Bluetooth stack from the command line. The application includes a simple shell functionality and allows e.g. start advertising or discovery.

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